Seminarprogramm


Culture and Society: German History, Culture, Literature in an Intercultural Context

Culture and Society

" Fundamentals of Intercultural Communication & the Effects of Migration"


CLASS HOURS

  • Week 1: Tuesday-Thursday, 8:30-11:45

  • Week 2: Monday -Wednesday 8:30-11:45- Thursday- Berlin trip

  • Week 3: Monday-Thursday, 8:30-11:45

  • Every week Friday –Saturday:

Weekend excursions, which emphasize a hands-on experience of German culture.


TEACHER:

Collette Wanjugu Döppner (cwanjugudoeppner@gmail.com)

Dr. Cynthia Chalupa


  • INFORMATION ON THE COURSE CONTENT


COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVES


At the end of the course the students will be able to talk about and critically discuss topics like:


  • What is culture? Your Culture and the German Culture, before and now

  • What is intercultural communication and competence and why do we need it?

  • Migration in Germany at the moment

  • European politics and dealing with migration currently in Europe

  • Look at the main concepts of culture, stereotypes, prejudices, values and migration. Stereotypes of own country and also Germany will be discussed

  • Cultural dimensions and differences- focus on German and participants’ cultures. E.g. Direct and indirect (high and low context) communication and how it influences our environment and the people we interact with.

  • Our cultural values and how they influence us and those we interact with- migrants’ values and how they influence the new culture or are influenced in the new culture

  • Discuss migration’s impacts on individual, community, and national identities



COURSE MATERIALS

Course reader comprised of a variety of authentic texts, works of art, literary selections, and homework assignments.


Heringer, Hans Jürgen (2004): Interkulturelle Kommunikation. Tübingen und Bassel. A. Francke Verlag

Gumperz, John (1982): Discourse Strategies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.


Hinnenkamp, Volker (1989): Interaktionale Soziolinguistik und Interkulturelle Kommunikation.

Gesprächsmanagement zwischen Deutschen und Türken. Tübingen: Niemeyer.


Handschuck, Sabine/ Schröer Hubertus (2012): Interkulturelle Orientierung und Öffnung. Augsburg:Ziel


Holliday Adrian/ Hyde Martin/ Kullman John (2006): Intercultural Communication- An advanced Resource book. New York: Routledge


Nazarkiewicz, Kirsten/ Krämer Gesa (2012): Handbuch Interkulturelles Coaching. Göttingen:Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht GmbH


Nakayama Thomas K./Halualani Rona Tamiko (2013): The Handbook of Critical intercultural Communication. West Sussex: Blackwell Publishing Ltd


Kumbier Dagmar/Schulz von Thun Friedmann( 2013): Interkulturelle Kommunikation: Methoden, Modelle, Beispiele. 2006 Reinbek bei Hamburg:Rowohlt.


Scollon, Ronald. (2012): Intercultural communication : a discourse approach- 3. ed. - Malden [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell


Hofstede, Geert(2010): Cultures and organizations : software of the mind ; intercultural cooperation and its importance for survival . - Rev. and exp. 3. ed. - New York [u.a.] : McGraw-Hill


Jackson, Jane (2012): The Routledge handbook of language and intercultural communication

- London [u.a.] : Routledge

Solimano, Andrés( 2010) :“Why People Move or Stay Put: International Migration Is the result of compelling and Conflicting Factors,” in Solimano, International Migration in the Age of Crisis and Globalization: Historical and Recent Experiences .Cambridge


Harzig, Christiane and Dirk Hoerder with Donna Gabaccia (2009), “The Receiving Society: Economic Insertion, Acculturation, Politics, and New Belongings,” in Harzig, Hoerder, Gabaccia, What is Migration History? .Polity



Storti,Craig (1994):Cross-Cultural Dialogues- 74 brief encounters with cultural difference. Intercultural Press, Inc.


Harzig. C and Hoerder.D with Gabaccia D.(2009):What is Migration History?.Polity Press, Cambridge and Malden


Berger Mel (1996): Cross- Cultural Team Building: Guidelines for more effective communication and negotiation. Mc Graw-Hill.

Cholewinski R (2005):Irregular migrants: access to minimum social rights. Council of Europe.


Aleksynska. M and Chiswick. B.R.(2011 May):Religiosity and Migration- Travel into One’s Self versus Travel across Cultures. Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit. Institut for the Study of Labor.


Yildirim-Krannig, Yeliz (2014):Kultur zwischen nationalstaaatlichkeit undMigration.Plädoyer für einenParadigmenwechsel. transcript Verlag,Bielefeld

TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

Day

Time

Topic


Tue.

7. Jan

8:30-11:45

  • Introduction.

  • Overview of our class.

  • Expectations on our class

  • Getting to know each other

  • What is culture?

  • Talking about one’s own identity and what that means

Think of more ideas about culture – to be discussed in the next class.

Group exercise on a model of culture

Wed.

8. Jan

8:30-11:45

  • Cultural differences and whether they still fit in today's world.

  • Dimensions of culture (e.g., direct and indirect communication)

Students should bring their own observations- teacher will hand out material to be worked on



Thur.

9. Jan

8:30-11:45

  • Excursion to Antonius Netzwerk mensch

  • Discussion on integration, acceptance -in connection to the excursion

Reader- students will read a text on culture and migration in preparation for the class on 10.1.20


Mon.

13. Jan

8:30-11:45

  • Migration in Europe currently- challenges and difficulties-Guest Dr. Hautumm

  • Theories of Migration and cultural interaction

Dr. Hautumm will show a film on migration and explain the current situation in Europe.

After there will be a discussion.

Tue.

14. Jan

8:30-11:45

  • Migration in human history.

After explaining the theories on Migration and culture the students will be required to explain what they understood on the text the teacher distributed on 9.1.20. Discussion.

Wed.

15. Jan

8:30-11:45

  • Non verbal communication

  • Migration, and the fight against social exclusion ,racism and xenophobia.


Different forms of body language in different cultures will be looked at and discussed.

Discussion using text from Cholewinski R (2005):Irregular migrants: access to minimum social rights. Council of Europe.


Thur.-Sat

3 days

  • Trip to Berlin- Discussion on (German) culture, inclusion, racism then and now.

  • Eu and its role in the German culture/politics today

Excusrions to different places in Berlin

Mon.

20. Jan

8:30-11:45

  • Stereotypes , prejudices and how to go about them- theory, practical exercise and discussion

Through simulation games, the students will get to understand the topic on stereotypes and prejudices further

Tue.

21. Jan

8:30-11:45

  • Culture shock-Re-entry culture shock


  • Examples of culture shock among refugees and migrants

Introduction and discussion of the W culture shock curve.

Exercise on culture shock

Wed.

22. Jan

8:30-11:45

  • Cultural values and how they affect our behaviour and attitudes

  • Exam

Group exercise on values- after a discussion and theory

Explanation of what is required in the exam


Thur.

24. Jan

8:30-11:45

  • Exam

Feedback

Exam




INFORMATION ON CLASS PARTICIPATION, ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMS


ASSIGNMENTS

  • Primarily readings or web research assignments with accompanying short-answer questions. Students will also conduct research on a topic of their choosing about which they will present.


QUIZZES AND EXAMS

  • Given the scope of material and short duration of the course, there will be a short exam at the end of the course.


PRACTICE MATERIALS

  • N/A


PROFESSIONALISM & CLASS PARTICIPATION

Class discussion is a vital element of this course; it is also a necessary part of the preparation for the homework tasks that will be assigned. Class participation will be evaluated based on level of participation (using a rubric) and attendance in class. Excellent class participation requires thorough and conscientious preparation outside of class. Working with class material outside of class and actively participating in class will help students develop their ability to express opinions, form questions, and develop interpretations about the material we are studying.


MISSED CLASSES

Because students must be present to participate, frequent absences will negatively affect this portion of their grade. A poor grade in class participation (i.e., many absences) can lower the course grade an entire point.



Class Participation Rubric



Name: __________________________ Date: __________________________



Active class participation is important to your skill development and to the success of the course. Your class participation grade is an average of two components: a) your availability to participate (when you are not here, you are not participating), and b) your degree of preparation and participation when you are in class. Your final score will be expressed in percentage form. If you have questions about how to improve your class participation grade, please see your instructor as soon as possible.

A) Availability for Participation

Number of unexcused absences/ Number of days in this period x 100 = % of days missed

________/________ x 100 = ________ (% days missed)

Subtract the % days missed from 100 to get percent attended:

100 - _______= Percent attended



Preparation/Participation

0-60

 Not prepared for class; does not participate.

70

Rarely prepared; rarely able to answer when called on; rarely volunteers.

80

Usually prepared, but preparation inconsistent; answers when called on; willingly participates in class activities; stays on task during partner/group work.

90

Regularly prepared; answers when called on; willingly participates in class activities; stays on task during partner/group work; volunteers answers to open questions (not directed at anyone).

100

High level of preparation; answers when called on; willingly participates in class activities; stays on task during partner/group work; volunteers answers to open questions (not directed at anyone). Shares pertinent information. Asks questions or volunteers information that is relevant to the class. 


Overall Participation Grade:

(A: Percent attended __________ + B: Participation __________)/ 2 = __________%

Comments/suggestions for improvement:



INFORMATION ON GRADING AND ECTS


ACADEMIC STANDARDS

  • The course grade is based on homework, class participation, and a culminating presentation.


Class Participation & Homework

50%

Presentation

50%

Total

100%

Upon successful completion, 4 ECTS will be awarded for the class.


GRADING SCALE:


Percentage

Description

A= 90-100%

1.0

very good: an outstanding achievement

1.3

B= 80-90%

1.7

good: an achievement substantially above average requirements

2.0

2.3

C= 70-80%

2.7

satisfactory: an achievement which corresponds to average requirements

3.0

3.3

D= 60-70%

3.7

sufficient: an achievement which barely meets the requirements

4.0

F= 0-60%

5.0

not sufficient / failed: an achievement which does not meet the requirements

Cultural, Intercultural, and Social Dimensions of Globalization -- Fundamentals of Intercultural Communication & Migration (Week 4 , Language: English)

Hessen: IWU Curricular Outlines

- Minimum requirements -

Culture and Society

Fundamentals of Intercultural Communication and Migration

CLASS HOURS

- Week 1: Monday-Thursday, 8:30-11:45

- Week 2: Monday 8:30-11:45

- Week 3: Monday-Thursday, 8:30-11:45

- Every week: Friday –Saturday:

Weekend excursions, which emphasize a hands-on experience of German culture.

TEACHER

Name: Collette Wanjugu Döppner

Email: cwanjugudoeppner@gmail.com - Phone: +49-661-2429799

INFORMATION ON THE COURSE CONTENTS

COURSE DESCRIPTION & OBJECTIVES

At the end of the course the students will be able to talk about and critically discuss topics like:

  • What is culture? Your Culture and the German Culture then and now
  • What is intercultural communication and competence and why do we need it?
  • Migration in Germany at the moment
  • European politics and dealing with migration currently in Europe
  • Look at the main concepts of culture, stereotypes, prejudices, values and migration. Stereotypes of own country and also Germany will be discussed
  • Cultural dimensions and differences- focus on German and participants’ cultures. E.g. Direct and indirect (high and low context) communication and how it influences our environment and the people we interact with.
  • Our cultural values and how they influence us and those we interact with- migrants’ values and how they influence the new culture or are influenced in the new culture
  • Discuss migration’s impacts on individual, community, and national identities

COURSE MATERIALS

Course reader comprised of a variety of authentic texts, works of art, literary selections, and homework assignments.

Heringer, Hans Jürgen (2004): Interkulturelle Kommunikation. Tübingen und Bassel. A. Francke Verlag

Gumperz, John (1982): Discourse Strategies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hinnenkamp, Volker (1989): Interaktionale Soziolinguistik und Interkulturelle Kommunikation.

Gesprächsmanagement zwischen Deutschen und Türken. Tübingen: Niemeyer.

Handschuck, Sabine/ Schröer Hubertus (2012): Interkulturelle Orientierung und Öffnung. Augsburg:Ziel

Holliday Adrian/ Hyde Martin/ Kullman John (2006): Intercultural Communication- An advanced Resource book. New York: Routledge

Nazarkiewicz, Kirsten/ Krämer Gesa (2012): Handbuch Interkulturelles Coaching. Göttingen:Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht GmbH

Nakayama Thomas K./Halualani Rona Tamiko (2013): The Handbook of Critical intercultural Communication. West Sussex: Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Kumbier Dagmar/Schulz von Thun Friedmann( 2013): Interkulturelle Kommunikation: Methoden, Modelle, Beispiele. 2006 Reinbek bei Hamburg:Rowohlt.

Scollon, Ronald. (2012): Intercultural communication : a discourse approach- 3. ed. - Malden [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell

Hofstede, Geert(2010): Cultures and organizations : software of the mind ; intercultural cooperation and its importance for survival . - Rev. and exp. 3. ed. - New York [u.a.] : McGraw-Hill

Jackson, Jane (2012): The Routledge handbook of language and intercultural communication

- London [u.a.] : Routledge

Solimano, Andrés( 2010) :“Why People Move or Stay Put: International Migration Is the result of compelling and Conflicting Factors,” in Solimano, International Migration in the Age of Crisis and Globalization: Historical and Recent Experiences .Cambridge

Harzig, Christiane and Dirk Hoerder with Donna Gabaccia (2009), “The Receiving Society: Economic Insertion, Acculturation, Politics, and New Belongings,” in Harzig, Hoerder, Gabaccia, What is Migration History?  .Polity

Storti,Craig (1994):Cross-Cultural Dialogues- 74 brief encounters with cultural difference. Intercultural Press, Inc.

Harzig. C and Hoerder.D with Gabaccia D.(2009):What is Migration History?.Polity Press, Cambridge and Malden

Berger Mel (1996): Cross- Cultural Team Building: Guidelines for more effective communication and negotiation. Mc Graw-Hill.

Cholewinski R (2005):Irregular migrants: access to minimum social rights. Council of Europe.

Aleksynska. M and Chiswick. B.R.(2011 May):Religiosity and Migration- Travel into One’s Self versus Travel across Cultures. Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit. Institut for the Study of Labor.

Yildirim-Krannig, Yeliz (2014): Kultur zwischen nationalstaaatlichkeit undMigration.Plädoyer für einen Paradigmenwechsel. transcript Verlag,Bielefeld

TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

  • Description of class schedule as planned

Date

Time

Topic

Reading/ Assignments/ Additional Practice Materials

Mon. 7. Jan

8.30-11.45

    • Introduction.
    • Overview of our class.
    • Expectations on our class
    • Getting to know each other
    • What is culture?
    • Talking about one’s own identity and what that means

Think of more ideas about culture – to be discussed in the next class.
Group exercise on a model of culture

Tue.
8. Jan

8.30-11.45

    • Cultural differences and whether they still fit in today's world.
    • Dimensions of culture (e.g., direct and indirect communication)

Students should bring their own observations- teacher will hand out material to be worked on

Wed.
9. Jan

8.30-11.45

    • Culture and migration.
    • Current topics in Germany and the EU. How culture is changing due to migration.

Introduction to the topic by reading current news articles that will be discussed in class along with a few intercultural theories on culture change.
Reader- students will read a text on culture and migration in preparation for the class on 10.1.19

Thur.
10. Jan

8.30-11.45

    • Migration in human history.
    • Theories of Migration and cultural interaction
After explaining the theories on Migration and culture the students will be required to explain what they understood on the text the teacher distributed on 9.1.19. Discussion.

Mon.
14. Jan

8.30-11.45

Cultural values and how they affect our behaviour and attitudes

Group exercise on values- after a discussion and theory

Tue.
15. Jan

8.30-11.45

Non verbal communication

Different forms of body language in different cultures will be looked at and discussed.

Wed.
16. Jan

8:30-11:45

Migration, and the fight against social exclusion ,racism and xenophobia.

Discussion using text from Cholewinski R (2005):Irregular migrants: access to minimum social rights. Council of Europe.

Thur.
17. Jan

8.30-11.45

Stereotypes , prejudices and how to go about them- theory, practical exercise and discussion Through simulation games, the students will get to understand the topic on stereotypes and prejudices further

Mon.
21. Jan

8.30-11.45

    • Culture shock-Re-entry culture shock

    • Examples of culture shock among refugees and migrants

Introduction and discussion of the W culture shock curve.
Exercise on culture shock

Tue.
22. Jan

8:30-11:45


    • Polishing on any unfinished topics
    • Preparation for the exam
Explanation of what is required in the exam

Wed.
23. Jan

8:30-11:45


    • Exam
Feedback

Exam

Thur.
24. Jan

8:30-11:45


    • Exam
Feedback

Exam

INFORMATION ON CLASS PARTICIPATION, ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMS

ASSIGNMENTS

  • Primarily readings or web research assignments with accompanying short-answer questions. Students will also conduct research on a topic of their choosing about which they will present.

QUIZZES AND EXAMS

    Given the scope of material and short duration of the course, there will be a short exam at the end of the course.

PRACTICE MATERIALS

  • N/A

PROFESSIONALISM & CLASS PARTICIPATION

  • Class discussion is a vital element of this course; it is also a necessary part of the preparation for the homework tasks that will be assigned.  Class participation will be evaluated based on level of participation (using a rubric) and attendance in class. Excellent class participation requires thorough and conscientious preparation outside of class.  Working with class material outside of class and actively participating in class will help students develop their ability to express opinions, form questions, and develop interpretations about the material we are studying.

MISSED CLASSES

  • Because students must be present to participate, frequent absences will negatively affect this portion of their grade. A poor grade in class participation (i.e., many absences) can lower the course grade an entire point.

INFORMATION ON GRADING AND ECTS

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

The course grade is based on homework, class participation, and a culminating presentation.

Class Participation & Homework

50%

Presentation

50%

Total

100%

Upon successful completion, 4 ECTS will be awarded for the class.

Percentage

Description

A= 90-100%

1.0

very good: an outstanding achievement

1.3

B= 80-90%

1.7

good: an achievement substantially 

above average requirements

2.0
2.3

C= 70-80%

 
2.7  satisfactory: an achievement which corresponds to average requirements
3.0
 3.3

D= 60-70%

 
 3.7

sufficient: an achievement which barely meets the requirements

 4.0

F= 0-60%

 5.0

not sufficient / failed: an achievement which does not meet the requirements

Art and Society

Hessen: IWU Course Outline

ART & SOCIETY

CLASS HOURS

Week 1: Tuesday-Thursday, 8:30-11:45

Week 2: Monday and Wednesday, 8:30-11:45

Week 3: Monday-Thursday, 8:30-11:45 (wed. exc.)

Wednesday, 8:30-10:00

PROFESSOR

Name: Ricardo Pimentel

Email: ricardoroquepimentel@gmail.com

1)INFORMATION ON THE COURSE CONTENT

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is an introductory general study of culture, through a comparative analysis of artists, artistic movements, paradigmatic works and their relation with society at large.

COURSE OUTLINE

From prehistoric cave paintings, to religious frescos in renaissance cathedrals, or to grafitti in the streets of contemporary cities, it is a common sense idea that every society has always found its specific ways and means of representing itself.

In this course, students will be guided through the major art periods in a global and intercultural context. Mainly focused on Western culture, they will gather examples spanning from the medieval 12th century up to the present day, with the purpose of analysing artistic phenomena and its relation to society.

These examples will be interpreted through a comparative analysis of artists and artistic movements, regarding fundamental questions and theories about the arts and specific forms of media, as well as their specific historical contexts.

The time frame of this course is chosen considering the Printing Revolution, in fifteenth-century Europe, a pin point for an era of mass communication which altered the structure of society and was determinant for the way we still nowadays perceive literature, visual arts, music, theater and film.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

-develop a working vocabulary to critically evaluate a work of art;

-gather refrences to identify the major western art periods;

-discuss the roles of both high culture and folk/pop culture within society;

-identify an existing family tree in Western culture and its relation with other non-eurocentric practises;

-understand the dynamic interaction between visual arts, music, theater, film and literature.


COURSE MATERIALS

Course reader comprised of a variety of authentic texts, works of art, literary selections and homework assignments.

TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

Date

Time

Topic

Reading/ Assignments/ Additional Practice Materials

Tue.

07. Jan

8:30- 11:45

Overview of the theories of representation from ancient Greece to postmodernity.

The Medieval period. Iconography and the symbolic representation in western and oriental societies.

Course reader, research, multimedia documentation.

Wed.

08.Jan

8:30- 11:45

The Renaissance. Humanism and the rise of the Bourgeoisie. Linear perspective. Gutenberg and the Printing Revolution.

See above

Thu.

09. Jan

8:30-

11:45

Edo period. Ukiyo-e printing art: The Floating World of the hedonistic 17th-19th centuries Japan. Kabuki Theatre.

See above

Mon.

13. Jan

8:30- 11:45

Enlightenment and Neoclassicism. Return to the Ancient Greece. Reason over superstition. The rise of the public sphere.

See above

Wed.

15. Jan

8:30- 11:45

Modernism(I). 19th century Industrial Revolution. From romanticism to the vanguards in early 20th century. Photography and society. The invention of cinema. The end of the “real” in representation. Impressionism. Dadaism. Surrealism. Russian constructivism. German expressionism.

See above

Mon.

20. Jan

8:30- 11:45

Modernism(II). The post-industrial society after WWII.Abstract expressionism. Pop Art. Minimalism.

See above

Tue.

21. Jan

8:30- 11:45

Postmodernism(I). The dematerialization of the art object and “The end of History”. Conceptual art. Fluxus. Skepticism, irony and the rejection of ideologies.

The Return of the Real: art as a simulacrum.

See above

Wed.

22. Jan

8:30- 10:15

Postmodernism(II).Pop culture, subculture and counterculture. Grafitti and hip hop: reclaiming the public space. Digital media and the virtual space.

See above

Thu.

23. Jan

8:30- 11:45

Presentations (I)

See above





2)INFORMATION ON CLASS PARTICIPATION, ASSIGNMENTS AND EXAMS

ASSIGNMENTS

Primarily readings or web research assignments with accompanying short-answer questions and multimedia support documentation.

Practical exercises that may involve drawing, filming, sound recording and writing, with the purpose of allowing other approaches to some of the topics presented.

Students will conduct research on a topic of their choosing about which they will present.

In addition, there will be continuous tutoring regarding media support suitable for the presentations.

EXAMS

Due to the short duration of the course, instead of exams, students will complete research and conduct a presentation in the end of the program. This will present as the sum of the students inquiry on they’re

PRACTICE MATERIALS

N/A

PROFESSIONALISM & CLASS PARTICIPATION

Frequent and active participation, willingness to self-reflect, willingness to work in groups/teams, thorough and conscientious preparation outside of class.

MISSED CLASSES

Frequent non-attendence (actions in consultation with the ISU management)

3)INFORMATION ON GRADING AND ECTS

ACADEMIC STANDARDS

The course grade is based on class participation, homework and a culminating presentation.

Class Participation

40%

Homework

20%

Presentation

40%

Total

100%

Upon successful completion, 4 ECTS will be awarded for the class.

GRADING SCALE:

Percentage

Description


A90>100%

1.0

very good: an outstanding achievement



1.3


B80>90%

1.7

good: an achievement substantially above average requirements


2.0


2.3


C70>80%

2.7

satisfactory: an achievement which corresponds to average requirements


3.0


3.3


D60>70%

3.7

sufficient: an achievement which barely meets the requirements


4.0


F0>60%

5.0

not sufficient / failed: an achievement which does not meet the requirements






This course description was issued on: Jul 2019